New Zealand KORU® apples hitting U.S. ports

Article by: The Produce News

May 16th, 2017

Coast to Coast Growers Cooperative announced that container shipments of KORU®  apples, grown in New Zealand, have begun arriving at U.S. ports. The KORU® variety is also now produced in the United States, but the bulk of the current available crop is harvested annually in New Zealand, where the apple was discovered and brought to market initially.

Eighty-five percent of this year’s New Zealand KORU® crop is being shipped to the U.S. for distribution and sales through three suppliers that represent the Coast to Coast Growers Cooperative: Borton Fruit and Oneonta Starr Ranch Growers of Washington state; and New York Apple Sales of New York state.

While the first May arrivals of KORU® have been sold, more containers will be arriving later in May and over the next few months, so it is still possible to order these New Zealand KORU® apples in tray-pack cartons as well as pouch bags. Fruit quality is exceptional, according to Tim Byrne, manager of Coast to Coast Growers Cooperative. “Eighty percent of these apples are in the three prime sizes, really perfect-size fruit,” he said in a press release. “This is the fourth New Zealand crop slated for export to North America. These apples are ideal in many ways — sweet flavor, crisp flesh, great color and good size.”

A cross between Fuji and Braeburn varieties, the KORU brand is positioned as a premium apple, much like Honeycrisp. “KORU® brings together the subtle sweetness of the Fuji with the Braeburn’s slight tang,” Byrne said in the release. “It’s really an inspired combination, perfect for eating, baking and cooking.”

KORU apples are being supported with point-of-sale and marketing materials, including display bins, high-graphic merchandising cartons and pouch bags. These promotional materials can be obtained at no cost through the Coast to Coast Growers Cooperative supplier from which you order.

Posted May 17, 2017


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